Agreement On International Investment

Agreement On International Investment

With a stock of €506.4 billion (2017), almost half of Germany`s foreign direct investment is invested in other EU member states. The turnover abroad that German companies achieve thanks to these investments (€1.2 billion) far exceeds exports to these countries (€0.8 billion) (2017). These investments are protected by 14 German BITs (intra-EU BITs), for example. B with Bulgaria, Poland and the Czech Republic. Although this represents just over 10% of the 129 German TPs in force, more than half of the ISDS arbitration proceedings initiated by German companies are directed against EU-28 states. Historically, the emergence of the international investment framework can be divided into two distinct eras. The first era — from 1945 to 1989 — was marked by differences of opinion among countries on the degree of protection that international law should afford to foreign investors. While most industrialized countries have argued that foreign investors should be entitled to a minimum standard of treatment in each host economy, developing and socialist countries have tended to assert that foreign investors do not need to be treated differently from domestic companies. In 1959, the first NTBs were completed and, over the next decade, many of the contents that form the basis of the majority of the ILO currently in force were developed and refined.

In 1965, the Convention on the Settlement of Investment Disputes between States and Nationals of Other States was opened for signature by countries. The reason given was to establish ICSID as an institution facilitating the reconciliation of investor-state disputes. BITs and some ITPTias also contain a provision on investor-state dispute resolution. As a general rule, this gives investors the right to submit a case to an international arbitral tribunal in the event of a dispute with the host country. The joint arbitration proceedings are the International Centre for Settlement of Investment Disputes (ICSID), the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law (UNCI) and the International Chamber of Commerce (ICC). IIA Mapping Project The IIA Mapping Project is a cooperative initiative between UNCTAD and universities around the world to represent the content of IIAs. The resulting database serves as a tool to understand trends in the development of the IIA, assess the prevalence of different policy approaches and identify examples of contracts. . . .

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