Sudetenland And The Munich Agreement 1938

Sudetenland And The Munich Agreement 1938

Hitler was open to his refusal to accept many of the terms of the Treaty of Versaille. Shortly after serving as Federal Chancellor in 1933, he began to arm the country again, breaking restrictions on the Bundeswehr. In 1936 he sent German troops to the Rhineland and in March 1938 he joined Germany and Austria. Czechoslovakia was the next logical step in its aggression and the German Nazis in the Sudetenland were said to stoke the problems that led to the crisis studied here. Edvard Benes, the leader of Czechoslovakia, feared that if Germany won the Sudetenland, most Czech defences would be handed over to the Germans and remain defenseless. The Czechoslovakians were appalled by the colony of Munich. They were not invited to the conference and felt betrayed by the British and French governments. Many Czechs and Slovaks describe the Munich agreement as a Munich diktat (Czech: Mnichovska diktéta); in Slovak: Mnechovska diktét). The phrase «Munich betrayal» (Czech: Mnichovska zrada; In Slovak: Mnechovska zrada) is also used because Czechoslovakia`s military alliance with France proved useless. This is also reflected in the fact that the French government, in particular, had considered that Czechoslovakia would be held responsible for any European war that would result if the Czechoslovak Republic defended itself by force against German abuses.

In 1938, the Soviet Union was allied with France and Czechoslovakia. In September 1939, the Soviets were in every respect a fighter with Nazi Germany, due to Stalin`s fears that a second Munich agreement with the Soviet Union would replace Czechoslovakia. Thus, the agreement indirectly contributed to the outbreak of war in 1939. [60] The agreement authorizing germany`s annexation of the Sudetenland was signed on 29 September 1938. Adolf Hitler welcomes Neville Chamberlain upon the arrival of the British Prime Minister in Munich on 29 September 1938. Chamberlain (1869-1940), British Prime Minister from May 1937 to May 1940, was the British leader in the appeasement of Nazi Germany in the late 1930s. National Archives and Records Administration, College Park Chamberlains flight to Berchtesgaden followed a week later to Godesberg and on September 29 another to Munich. In Munich, Chamberlain obtained an international agreement for Hitler to have the Sudetenland in exchange for Germany, which made no further requests for countries in Europe.

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